Tag Archives: kenneth kay

Frost/Nixon Is Resonating Life-And-Death Boxing Match

The strength of the acclaimed 2006 play Froist/Nixon is that no one is depicted in pure white hats or black hats. That facet is brought out in the Maltz’s production better than in any earlier edition thanks to a complex multi-faceted creation by actor John Jellison under the impeccable direction of J. Barry Lewis.

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Maltz Sells Scorching, Atypically Profane Glengarry Glen Ross

The Maltz Jupiter Theatre delivers a courageous and skilled revival of Glengarry Glen Ross that depicts a group of foul-mouthed cutthroat Chicago real estate for whom nothing is out of bounds in order to make a sale.

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Dramaworks’ Quiet, Insightful Our Town Is Worth Investing Your Attention, Imagination

For such a seemingly simple play, Our Town requires the audience to generously invest their attention and imagination. Thornton Wilder’s classic only works when its visitors travel more than halfway there. But for those willing to make that journey, the gossamer delicate play can vibrate the heartstrings and the synapses.

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Heirs Behaving Badly: Dividing The Estate May Be Familiar

Plenty of laughter greets every witticism and absurdity in Palm Beach Dramaworks’ production of Dividing The Estate, Horton Foote’s acidic depiction of greed, jealousy and family. But through the laughter, you either silently thank God you don’t know these people or you curse fate that they are way too familiar.

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For One Day, Delray Beach Becomes Bedford Falls For Arts Garage’s Radio Theater Series

Arts Garage staged It’s A Wonderful Life as part of its Radio Theatre series, which kicked off in August with the radio play adaptation of A Star Is Born. Eight actors, plus two sound effects “actors” performed the play for one day only — a shame really that such a worthwhile production only had a matinee and evening performance. But others are on the calendar.

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Podcast Link To A Star Is Born Show By Arts Radio Network

Arts Radio Network kicked off its series of live radio play versions of iconic movies with a one-night production of A Star Is Born on Aug. 15 on the stage of the host, The Theatre at Arts Garage in Delray Beach. To hear a podcast of that full production, click here

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Local Teens Reveal Secrets Of Building The Next Generation Of Theatergoers

Teenagers may hold the survival secrets for South Florida theaters to build a crucial new generation of patrons. Students say they seek theater that is relevant, affordable, accessible, less elitist, touching the head and the heart, marketed through cyber-word of mouth, and pumped with sensory candy. Above all, their interest has to be stimulated as early as elementary school.

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Play Reading Series Kick Off At Plaza Theatre & Playgroup LLC

At The Plaza The Plaza Theatre in Manalapan will inaugurate Fresh Pages, a series of staged readings of new and unpublished scripts, at 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 29, with the new comedy Can I Really Date a Guy Who Wears …

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Neil Simon’s Chapter Two Masters The Meld Of Wit And Pathos At The Plaza

Director Michael Leeds and a solid cast at the Plaza Theatre in Manalapan have mastered Neil Simon’s challenging meld of witty comedy and throat-choking heartache, and make both perfectly plausible facets of life in Chapter Two.

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Mosaic’s Birds Is Insightful Sociological Drama Not Hitchcockian Thriller

Cannily, there is not a feather in sight during the entire 85-minute The Birds at the Mosaic Theatre — appropriate because the subject is not an eerie avian apocalypse, but how humanity reacts under extreme pressure. Conor McPherson’s adaptation is far more a sociological morality tale than Daphne du Maurier’s 1952 suspenseful novelette or Alfred Hitchcock’s 1963 pure thriller.

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