Tag Archives: Shannon Ouellette

Outre’s Reservoir Dolls Is Intriguing Idea That Stumbles

You can’t really blame the playwright Erika Soerenson or artistic directors for thinking that a distaff reinterpretation of the Quentin Tarantino film Reservoir Dogs might make an intriguing, funny and even socially revealing stage adaptation, Reservoir Dolls. But the Outré Theatre Company’s production iunderscores what a misbegotten idea this was because either the playwright did not know what she wanted in the end or Outré never communicated it.

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Commitment Makes Up For Spectacle In Outre’s Tommy

Outré Theatre Company’s edition of Tommy demonstrates how skill, imagination and pure guts can triumph over the most modest of means. Its greatest virtue in bringing the classic rock opera to the postage stamp stage is a total, laser-focused tsunami-strength commitment.

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Outre’s The Violet Hour Is A Daring, Flawed Modern Medea

Sometimes the daring efforts of Outré Theatre Company work beautifully such as Back of the Throat, An Illiad and Thrill Me, sometimes not so well such as Bed and Sofa, and Othello. Often, it’s both as with the current world premiere of The Violet Hour, A Modern Medea.

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Speaking Verse Needs Work, But Outre’s Othello Is Praise-Worthy Undertaking From Outre

Audiences need to savor the undeniable virtues of local Shakespearean productions — even when counter-balanced by well-intentioned but equally undeniable shortcomings. Such is the case with the laudable Outré Theatre Company production of Othello imaginatively directed by Christina Groom and featuring Troy Davidson in a persuasive central performance.

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Outre’s Ambitious Vision Of Much Ado About Nothing Only Works Part Of The Time

In keeping with Outré’s commitment to go-big-or-go-home, its Much Ado About Nothing is a valiant effort that only works some of the time. There are low comedy laughs, but the intricate word play and fleeting moments of verbal loveliness usually gets lost in the mouths of actors uncomfortable with Shakespearean speech.

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