Tag Archives: Margaret M. Ledford

Music Is The New Element In City Theatre’s Summer Shorts

Hardly unusual in musical theater, Meredith Bartmon strolls around the Carnival Studio stage singing passionately about her dreams and, later, her refusal to compromise those dreams. But this isn’t a two-and-half-hour epic on a national tour; this is one of nine 10-minute playlets in City Theatre’s 21st edition of Summer Shorts.

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Annual Summer Shorts Will Feature The Sound of Music

The ever-developing Summer Shorts Festival, now entering its 21st year in Miami, will sound a bit different this year: two of the ten-minute works will be musicals.

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Don’t Wait To See Thinking Cap’s Waiting For Waiting For Godot

In Thinking Cap Theatre’s Waiting For Waiting For Godot, the absurdity of life is moved from the center stage spotlight of Samuel Beckett’s play in progress to the dingy dark wings where two understudies are waiting in vain to go on.

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20th Summer Shorts Even More Consistently Funny & Poignant

Intriguing premises are the jumping off points for the nine flights of theatrical whimsy in City Theatre’s annual festival of short plays, Summer Shorts. While no discernable thread runs through the disparate works, the deftly comic playlets are shot through with a striation of poignancy, and the moving entries are leavened with flashes of humor.

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Family, Science, Feminism Evolve In Arts Garage’s Stimulating “The How And The Why”

Fine acting and direction elevate a script that navigates intellectual mazes and human emotions in The How and the Why at Theatre At Arts Garage.

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Shorts Gone Wild 2: More About Relationships Than Risque

So the Cowardly Lion walks into a gay bar…. That premise pretty reliably lets you know that you must be watching the new edition of Shorts Gone Wild 2, the mildly risqué festival of short plays with a LGBT underpinning.

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City Theatre’s Summer Shorts Kicks It Up A Notch Once Again

Efforts by City Theatre staffers to improve the consistency of its offerings has paid off: This edition of Summer Shorts is not only lushly and imaginatively produced with a noticeable extra bit of polish, but is more consistently funny and entertaining than any edition in recent memory.

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Naked Stage Unleashes Mercurial Emotions In Miss Julie

For a century, August Strindberg’s tragedy Miss Julie has been interpreted as a seesaw of power exercised through class and sexual politics. But in Naked Stage’s operatic production, as lives lie in ruins, everyone ultimately is revealed a slave, never a master, when they toy with those three elements.

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Juan C. Sanchez’s Disturbing Collection Of Playlets Is Anything But Paradise

Juan C. Sanchez’s Paradise Motel begins in the clouds and ends in the sewer. Charting five decades in the devolution of a fictional motel on Calle Ocho—and the parade of lovers, hustlers, sharks and addicts that have occupied its rooms—this collection of seven playlets presents an uncompromising vision of urban decay that will ring wincingly true for its Miami audience

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Caudle’s Visiting Hours At New Theatre Asks Should You Lie To The People You Care About

Until the final scene, it’s not terribly clear what New Theatre’s intriguing Visiting Hours is about or what it’s trying to say – and then the ideas come at you so fast that it takes a while afterward to sort out what playwright David Caudle has been setting up all night. Fortunately, the production led by director Margaret M. Ledford is consistently engaging and Caudle’s characters are absorbing enough to keep your attention.

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