Tag Archives: Matt Corey

The Storm-Tossed Seek Hope And Salvation In Dramawork’s The Night Of The Iguana

The emotional histrionics and pyrotechnic acting in the first act notwithstanding, it’s the quiet poignant moments of compassion and connection in the second act that are the most deeply affecting in Palm Beach Dramaworks’ skillful resurrection of Tennessee Williams’ The Night of the Iguana.

Posted in Performances, Reviews | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

City Theatre’s Summer Shorts Kicks It Up A Notch Once Again

Efforts by City Theatre staffers to improve the consistency of its offerings has paid off: This edition of Summer Shorts is not only lushly and imaginatively produced with a noticeable extra bit of polish, but is more consistently funny and entertaining than any edition in recent memory.

Posted in Performances, Reviews | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mad Cat’s Well-Named Mixtape Is Quirky, Passionate, Puzzling And Did We Forget Funny?

Mixtapes are by definition quirky, passionate, uninhibitedly self-expressive to the edge of self-indulgence, sometimes puzzling, sometimes touching, sometimes hilarious. Mad Cat Theatre Company’s theatrical/cinematic Mixtape 2 is all that — a compilation of playlets, snatches of poetry, music videos and short films by the region’s leading progressive, avant-garde theater.

Posted in Performances, Reviews | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mosaic’s Birds Is Insightful Sociological Drama Not Hitchcockian Thriller

Cannily, there is not a feather in sight during the entire 85-minute The Birds at the Mosaic Theatre — appropriate because the subject is not an eerie avian apocalypse, but how humanity reacts under extreme pressure. Conor McPherson’s adaptation is far more a sociological morality tale than Daphne du Maurier’s 1952 suspenseful novelette or Alfred Hitchcock’s 1963 pure thriller.

Posted in Performances, Reviews | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mosaic’s Edge Of Our Bodies Is Provocative If Confusing Drama

Playwright Adam Rapp shares Beckett’s indifference to whether audiences comprehend his idiosyncratic depiction of his dark vision. But in Mosaic Theatre’s The Edge of Our Bodies, he also is writing something of weight and worth, even if you’re not at all certain what it is.

Which brings us to Rapp’s The Edge of Our Bodies closing out Mosaic Theatre’s season. This extended monologue by a high school girl reading from her journal and acting out what she has written is by turns illuminating and opaque, precise and equivocal, comprehensible and incomprehensible.

Posted in Performances, Reviews | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment