Tag Archives: John Manzelli

Shorts Gone Wild Is Rainbow Of Gay-Themed Plays For Everyone

If the context of the eight sketches in Shorts Gone Wild 3 is primarily gay-centric, the material and performances have markedly improved year after year until it has reached a high-water mark in the series’ quality.

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20th Summer Shorts Even More Consistently Funny & Poignant

Intriguing premises are the jumping off points for the nine flights of theatrical whimsy in City Theatre’s annual festival of short plays, Summer Shorts. While no discernable thread runs through the disparate works, the deftly comic playlets are shot through with a striation of poignancy, and the moving entries are leavened with flashes of humor.

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Iris Acker, Naked Stage, Shiller To Be Honored With Carbonells

The Carbonell Awards will bestow its highest honors this month: Arsht Executive Vice President and Carbonell President oScott Shiller will receive the George Abbott Award, actress-director-producer-dancer-union leader-teacher Iris Acker will receive the Howard Kleinberg Award, and The Naked Stage troupe which created The 24-Hour Theatre Project will receive the Ruth Foreman Award.

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One-Man Restaurant Play Serves Up A Smorgasbord of Characters In Comic Fully Committed

John Manzelli plays a harried scheduler at a trendy restaurant — and about 40 coworkers and patrons — in Fully Committed at the Broward Center

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Talkin’ In The Green Room With… John Manzelli

Welcome to a regular, if intermittent feature: Irreverent, lighthearted question & answer sessions with some of South Florida’s best known professionals Producer, director, fight arranger, educator, arts advocate, and artistic director, John Manzelli has been best known in recent years …

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Well-Acted If Flawed Look At Race In Gospel According To Jerry At New Theatre

Sometimes when the company is engaging, it doesn’t matter whether the journey itself is a little bumpy or overly-familiar. Such is the power of winning performances by Christina Alexander and John Manzelli under Stephen Neal’s direction in New Theatre’s production on The Gospel According To Jerry.

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City Theatre’s Summer Shorts Kicks It Up A Notch Once Again

Efforts by City Theatre staffers to improve the consistency of its offerings has paid off: This edition of Summer Shorts is not only lushly and imaginatively produced with a noticeable extra bit of polish, but is more consistently funny and entertaining than any edition in recent memory.

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Summer Shorts Is, As Usual, A Daffy, Uneven, Goofy Smile

By Bill Hirschman Sometimes for actors, especially playing comedy, the only option is to jump off the cliff and see if you can fly. The miracle is that sometimes, as in City Theatre’s Summer Shorts, is that, indeed, they soar. …

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Playing A Dolphin, Dracula and Mothra In Same Show: Everyday Challenge At Summer Shorts

Imagine you’re Ken Clement in City Theatre’s Summer Shorts opening this week. One minute he’s a dolphin, a few minutes later he;s Dracula and still later he has to find his inner Mothra. Performing in the annual festival of short plays, a rite of summer now in its 18th edition, requires talents they don’t dwell on in drama school.

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Mosaic’s Birds Is Insightful Sociological Drama Not Hitchcockian Thriller

Cannily, there is not a feather in sight during the entire 85-minute The Birds at the Mosaic Theatre — appropriate because the subject is not an eerie avian apocalypse, but how humanity reacts under extreme pressure. Conor McPherson’s adaptation is far more a sociological morality tale than Daphne du Maurier’s 1952 suspenseful novelette or Alfred Hitchcock’s 1963 pure thriller.

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